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science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and then not messages that are speaking to a far broader size
campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sor
lab. the author of the sushi economy pulls the curtain that of the operatives that use social science to determine the outcome of elections. >> host: well, sasha this is a provocative and timely look as we are weeks away from the election. i want to know how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i covered campaigns beginning in philadelphia, so i was paying more attention to sort of tactics and techniques in the physical world of campaigns just because in the big city so much attention was being paid to the vote counted and precinct targeted so i talked to people that were making tv ads and i was always shocked as i think anybody that spent time on the campaigns is that most people couldn't explain to me why they did anything that they were doing. how do you know that and why do you do that and at some point they did it because the it always done it that we were they had some sort of a rule that wasn't based on any research. so some sort of skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and
all the furniture from the science wing. that'd show 'em. anna belle laughed her head-back laugh. learning happens in many different ways, i'm just saying. but even something this silly could get out of hand, and she knew it. the science teachers, especially, that was where scores most needed to come up. anna belle looked to the ceiling. after 15 years as an administrator, she knew ms. kaiser's kind. ms. kaiser was young, ms. kaiser had time and energy to spare and apparently tables too. [laughter] anna belle had been like ms. kaiser once, in another life, it seemed. can you tell carmen to lasso those teachers up? i told them, do not move furniture. then she hurried the talk along. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction, and after that there was still the matter of the squirrel eating through i.t. cables to address. after the meeting anna belle made her rounds. she came across a teacher agonizing over whether to shut down his fish tank. no be, anna belle told him, there's a living thing in there -- [laughter] so this next passage involves something that shouldn't ever hav
% registered democrats. but only 14% are republican. social science is only 6%. >> 70 2% self identify as liberal. which is a big disparity between them and the general public. john: you were a junior when obama was elected? >> it was light a little of the colt it happened across the nation. john: not just the attitude but there are actual space -- speech restriction red light, yellow light and this university was demoted? >> to policies unc maintains which is sexual-harassment if you attended college and other than unc it bans all sexually explicit jokes. john: david, you have a copy what did you find? >> sexually explicit jokes jokes, books, it is different -- difficult to control how you look at someone. policy in the residence halls to avoid using the returners spoken word in the way that offends. that is a rage asleep fraud. a picture of mitt romney would offend 70%. [laughter] john: you may not explicitly or implicitly asked for sex. john: then how do you get there? [laughter] is it automatically rate? >> these policies are not well thought out. this is what you get to with burea
. >>time for today's trivia. what is the science of brewing beer called? a. zorology b. zymurgy c. zumology the answer still to come this midday! winning lottery numbers. winning pick 3 numbers. 569 pick 4 winning numbers. 71,9,3 mega millions 36 million dollars. get yourself a ticket.ñóxó÷?÷?@?@? ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. a new study found that free birth control may dramatically reduce the number of teen pregnanices and abortions. the study looked at more than nine thousand girls and women at risk for unintended pregnancy in the saint louis area. researchers found over three years, that both abortions and teen births
? >> sam? >> it's a cumulus cloud. >> you have to try the science department. >>> this controversial headline, talking about a mom gene. there's some new research that says that could be something that actually gets that some women are better suited to give birth and be mothers. >> i have mom jeans. >> i'm wearing them now. cue the music. >>> get ready, everybody. trash to treasure in the house. it was a staple on "gaa." welcome to "gma" with this anchor showdown, like we've never done before. going to show you how to transform flea market bargains into stunning showpieces, we hope. yeah. we'll do our best, lara. >> that would be good of you. >> you might understand -- >> i'm lowering expectations, as the presidential nominees are both doing. >>> now, to the shocking murder mystery out of hollywood, that ended up with an up-and-coming tv actor dead. johnny lewis and officials say he went on a violent rampage, allegedly killing his landlady and then himself. was a designer drug behind all of it? abc's david wright has the latest from los angeles. david? >> reporter: that's the working
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
in math and science. he was even the science student of the year at the university of illinois. but after his adoptive mother passed away, ellis oon dropped t of school and headed to california with little money in his pocket. his skills were quickly recognized. he helped build the first ibm compatible mainframe system. in 1977, he and two of his colleagues broke off and started a company that would eventually become oracle. ellison took the company public in 1986, already a billion-dollar enterprise. now a $100 billion company, his mystique has grown as a billionaire who lives on the edge. he's made shareholders nervous while suffering body blows from mountain biking and surfing. he won a yacht race in sidney overcoming hurricane-strength winds that sank five competitors and drowned six participants. some have speculated he's the inspiration for the tony stark character in "the iron man" films, with ellison even making a cameo in the most recent sequel. ellison's passion for boating it now focused on the america's cup competition. >> this sis extreme sailing. >> he's the principle suppor
to come, cheeseburgers, fries, milk shakes in the name of science. >> why people are loading up on the fast food and getting paid amazing money to do it. it is all coming up. ♪ cheeseburger in paradise ♪ heaven on earth ♪ >> the next story either seems like a dream come true or a disaster waiting to happen. eating fast food, every day, and getting paid thousands to do it. >> big money here. all a new experiment conducted by doctors to measure exactly what fast food diets can do to you. abc's john donvan has the story. >> reporter: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. two sausage burritos. >> reporter: over and over and over again. it has been dave's life the past three months or so as has been eating the food. a precisely measured, 1,000 calories a day, extra meal daily, fast food only. >> how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein a researcher at washington medical school in st. louis trying to understand why weight gain ladies to diseases like diabetes and hypertension and how that relate
to finance the transcontinental railroad, let's start the national academy of sciences, let's start land grant colleges, because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans, because if all americans are getting opportunity, were all one of the better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, but enhances it. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. and when it comes to education, what i've said is we've got to reform schools that are not working. we something called race to the top. we've said, we will give you more money if you initiate reforms. as a consequence, had 46 states around the country have made a real difference. but what i've also said is, let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead and our people are skilled and able to succeed. and hard-pressed states right now cannot all do that. in fact, we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think any more teachers. i do, because i think that is the kind
associate degree, two associate degrees. one in social sciences and behavior and another in administration of justice. currently at san francisco state working on my bachelor's degree in justice studies and also with a minor in urban planning. the reason why i would like to be a part of the balboa park station citizen's advisory committee is because i would like to represent the voice of the community, more specifically in the development that is occurring in the area. i would also like to assist in figuring out how to keep the community voice involved and accountability with the city agencies involved and impact to make deadlines and [speaker not understood] commitments. and then, so, also john avalos is a huge advocate for our community, but it's important to have the community involved. >> thank you, ms. garcia. >>> thank you very much. >> and next we will hear mr. walker. if you would like to speak today. and are there any other applicants that were not listed? okay. oh, i'm sawyer, i thought you were not here today. >>> i'm not alex. i'm henry [speaker not understood]. >> great. so, h
were not backed up by science and health experts say by taking the supplements people may be putting themselves are risk when you have the flu your dog or cat is at risk, passing in the flow from humans to pets, scientists and veterinarians admit the concept is poorly understood but they say it is occurring more and more raising the risk for disease mutation, if you have the flu distance yourself from your pat and if your dog has a fever you can tell if their nose is warm or if they have a runny nose take them to the vet for testing and treatment. >> they are so cute. you may want to grab a jacket, tom skilling has details on the big dip in temperatures. y ♪ ♪ ♪ pop goes the world ♪ ♪ it goes something like this ♪ [ female announcer ] pop in a whole new kind of clean with new tide pods... just one removes more stains than the 6 next leading pacs combined. pop in. stand out. [ bell tolls ] so, why are we up here? because farmers offers a new-roof discount? [ thudding ] oh, boy. yep. and it's an agent's job to help people find new ways to save. there's
of engineering and applied science. emma i have been at this university for three years we have a strong community it doesn't surprise me that people who did not know him came out to find him and support the effort ... madulla was from hyde park new york. his family says the harbor wasnt the type of place he would normally visit because hes more of an indoors person. a body was pulled from lake michigan this morning near navy pier. marine units pulled the body just after eight o'clock this morning. workers for a boat cleaning service spotted the body just north of the pier. police don't have an identification. they aren't saying if it's a man or a woman. schaumburg police are seeking we are here in arlington heights when the tylenol mystery connection was first made ... >>helen jensen was the first to see ... this nurse spoke to victims' families and went to the home of one of the victims and found that tainted tylenol ... >>because they told me that they all took tylenol i counted those capsules ... she sounded the alarm but law enforcement had their doubts ... they said i couldn't
necessary to make a bomb. >> i rance president says the nuclear program is just advancing science their program is moving quickly doubling its capacity to produce 20 percent enriched uranium over the summer. there will be a media frenzy tomorrow at a house in roseville michigan just outside of detroit when authorities dig into a driveway in search of potential schuman remains. human remains. ground penetrating radar spotted an anomaly something out of the ordinary after police received what they believe to be a credible source. but they are skeptical that the remains of their belonged to hoffa. a change in this year's flu vaccine that you really should know about. 80 years of chicago history captured by three generations of photographers. what are these flowers going to turn into? >> brad is a special education teacher and conducts class were ever there is a lesson to be taught. michael for the kids i am dealing with is i would like to help them become as independent as possible. if this freshman is an example, it's working. >> i like him because he was a good teacher and he he
as a politicalf th science and journalism -- he pivoted to some of the positions that he explicitly set aside during the primaries, where he became truly one of the most -- there were others, rick santorum and newt gingrich -- extremist candidates on key issues that appeal to independents. when a pos -- one of the most interesting things in this election is the growing gender gap. you are too young, but many in 1992 called it the year of the woman, because of the showdown between anita hill and at then- being-confirmed justice clarence thomas. where were the women's voices? you had that sense when georgetown student center fluk -- sandra fluke was called to testify on contraception and it was an all-metal panel. -- all-male panel. would you imagine that in the 21st century that contraception would be raised as a polarizing issue, huerta taken -- where todd akin is talking about legitimate rate. that has led to the fact that independent women are alienated by these extremists. we're not talking about abortion, which i think is a right and should be in this country. we're talking about women's
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
they build up the man immediately. >> excess demand for the platform is an early science and success and challenge as opposed to total failure. it is hard to know how large scale the test needs to be. large school districts, very large ones have a lot of students. doesn't take too many large school districts to be able to have a sufficiently sized test bed to do this rapidly. and to overcome that. we will find school systems willing to join. one avenue is the league of innovative schools and large school districts. this will be different but perhaps those schools signal interest and innovation and general technology to become part of the test bed to start to look and i hope this is something we can overcome but it will require some skill if we get a lot of excitement. >> could everyone join me in thanking our excellent offers an excellent panel. >> now the keynote speaker at the brookings institution forum. education secretary arne duncan talks about progress in k-12 education and his reform effort. following his remarks, questions from the audience. >> by the end of this decade to h
striking for their kids. >> how about science deniers. the science is in. you have to get that in. birther three is critical for learning. it is a funding issue. if you don't have money for kids until they are six years old to start kinder garden, you have missed that -- those critical brain development years. we are starting to fund public education too late. >> i want to unpack one thing pedro said so people understand. when we say integration is off the table in public schools, what we are talking about is that justice roberts ruled in 2007 in the seattle school's decision that schools could not take race into a factor at all to integrate public schools. that's where brown ended and so i just think as a big point, not that we have all the time in the world for it but part of these reform issues are also about reforming the courts. there are certain decisions we talk a lot about in money and politics. this area of integration is something that is going to come from reforming. >> i have been so revved up since education nation. we are doing a little education every week. you guys are alre
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> i've been warning you for months, there is an economic storm coming our way from europe and you need to take cover. i've given you reasons why. i pointed my finger at politicians who aren't doing enough to shelter you. i argued with economists, i even blamed you for your part in this. after all that, i got to give you some props. all you see is sunshine and blue skies ahead. despite those threatening thunder clou thunderclouds out of europe, the inconsistent monthly jobs report and the ongoing scorched earth politics in washington, apparently you are feeling pretty good. consumer confidence jumped in september. take a look at that, by nine points. optimism about the jobs market drove that increase despite the fact we only added 96,000 jobs last month. let's see what we do when we get the jobs numbers on friday. not so bad, 96,000 jobs. never mind this week's forecast for higher inflation. that's not bothering you. or the puny increase that
government president -- wow -- adam rotti who is studying political science. >> all right. are you ready? >> question one. >> yes. >> which of the following is not a college mascot? "a," the fighting pickle? "b" -- >> keep going. keep going. >> banana slug, the leafy sea dragons or the trolls? >> go. >> the leafy thing. >> the leafy sea dragon. university of georgia school of the arts. while the trolls are from trinity college. question two. in the climactic scene in the film "rudy," what football team is notre dame playing when rudy finally gets in the game? university of southern california? georgia tech? university of michigan? or "d," university of tennessee? >> get it right. >> come on, you're on your own. >> michigan. >> not university of michigan. what do you think? >> georgia tech? >> georgia tech. okay. next question. listen up. on the periodic table of elements, the symbols "k" and "h" each stand for what? is it -- >> oh, oh! >> tennessee. >> natural resources. >> helium, carbon and mercury, potassium and hydrogen or krypton and hydrogen? >> potassium and hydrogen. >> it's pota
been a strong category. and it continues to be. the sciences are strong. >> any negative implications from these numbers? >> the negative would be the part-time work. it's going to come back to this part-time work number. if you're working part time and that job for example, goes away or alternatively you're getting paid less than what you really need to survive, then obviously people are going to not be able to spend and be part of the economy like we want them. but another big part of the numbers is the 3.5 million job openings that do exist in this country. every time i speak to business leaders, they tell me one of the biggest issues facing the economy going forward is the skills gap that we see. there aren't enough people studying science engineering in this country to fill those jobs. >> stay with us rebecca. >>> we want to go now to nancy cordes at the white house with a question of how this is playing on the campaign trail. nancy, good morning. >> good morning to you charlie. the obama campaign and aides here at the white house will be thrilled by this numb
after death, the muscles responding to the electricity. >> science class sparks a bad idea in frankenwienie. a dog owner in tim burton's animation tale and when his pet pal sparky dies, victor takes his homework to the next level and brings the dog back to life. soon neighborhood bullies want in on the act, which may end up destroying the entire town. >> your mother and i are going to be taken. >> liam nessen's particular set of skills earn him "taken 2" he now needs her help. criminals lawyer to those he took out vow revenge and capture the spy and his wife on vacation. he gives his daughter atatorial so they can thwart the bad guys, again. rated pg-13. >>> nicole kidman is jail bait in queet the paperboy." she enlists the help of a journalist played by matthew mcconaughey. zac efron has a crush on kidman which may turn into a love or death triangle. it's rated r. >>> an odd story. how a dog made a phone call that brought police to the oeper's house. >>> how batman got arrested while he was fighting crime. >>> and the secret to losing weight and keeping the weight off. the
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> at least 30 people are dead across iraq. the muslim community seems to be part the. >> baghdad's shiite dominated government blames the recent attacks on sunni insurgents with al qaeda ties. two americans, one civilian are dead. it happened at a temporary checkpoint 0er79ed by coalition troops west of kabul. three afghan soldiers also died in the clash that officials say may have been provoked by insurgent fire. there has been a rise of militant suicide attacks. suicide attacks are a common tactic for the taliban. in an exclusive interview with cnn, anna koren talks to a would-be suicide bomber. >> this man believed he was carrying out god's will when he carried out an attack in kandahar province. he said he agreed to wear a suicide vest and kill as many people as possible. it's a special feeling that comes to you when you are ready for a suicide attack. no one can stop you, no one could stop me, that is except the law. when police arrested him five months ago in jalalabad, during the planning of the attack. he'
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
,000 math and science teachers and two million workers at community college and bring down the cost of college tuition. connell: president obama live in the campaign rally in fairfax, virginia with his first reaction to the drop in unemployment rate talking about the five million jobs he says have been created under his watch and now going into campaign arguments we are likely to hear. dagen: that is your headline if running for reelection. unemployment rate at the lowest level since he took office. back to where it was in january of 2009. on the other side from mitt romney later this morning. out campaigning and rich edson is reporting from virginia. how do these campaigns treat this? connell: we lost rich because he is at the obama rally. we will get to him after a quick break. dagen: can't hear us. dagen: virginia has big voices. connell: i have heard that before. mitt romney will be in dagen mcdowell's home state. we're back with more coverage. the dow up 50 points and wayne rogers still to come on markets now. dagen: from alabama or originally and the winner -- ♪ [ male annou
in the name of science. i should actually enlist in that focus group. >> we could be millionaires. great -- all the food on this show. >> we would be large -- living literally. >>> first, the manhunt along the u.s./mexico border. president obama has called the family of 30-year-old border patrol agent nicholas ivy who was killed early yesterday. >> mr. obama promised that ivy's family that those responsible will be found. abc's cecilia vega reports from southern, arizona. >> reporter: it is remote, dangerous, and deadly, and it was here on this dusty stretch of land where arizona meets mexico that three border patrol agents were fired on. one made it out safely. another was shot twice and expected to recover. but the third agent, 30-year-old nicholas ivy, was shot dead. >> we suspect that this is probably some type of narcotics trafficking event. that these agents encountered. but at this time, that would be speculative. >> reporter: the three agents headed to a spot just three miles north of the border. as they headed up a desert hill, someone fired right at them in what is being descri
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> there ar lot of things that are right in the world today. it is a friday. the refs are back at work in the nfl. and on this last day of the third quarter the dow and s&p ontrack for the best monthly gain since june. this is the fourth month in a row. the big boy this morning the k shields and mainstay investments subsidiaries of new york life celebrating a recent launch of the mainstay municipal opportunities fund. with the nasdaq, starbucks celebrating a third anniversary. the instant coffee and recent launch of its system for at home brewing which by all accounts is getting off to a good start. >> yes. a big leadership conference coming up at starbucks. i believe in howard schultz. came on our show. i like this product. i like the fact europe might be turning. mostly i like the fact that when he gave one of these big meetings in new orleans a couple years ago, to get united states jump-started, it worked. i think he's got a clear bet. i like starbucks. >> you mentioned the possibility of europe turning. t
, science, reading and so forth and don't want to take chinese and mandarin it is okay. do i get that right? >> absolutely, yes. it's okay. >> having heard that, what's your beef? >> my beef is less about, on that a particular point. if you actually read the governor's article it is well written. the last paragraph you have to embrace and love but it is the arrogance that somehow we, in government, are smart enough with our crystal ball to see what the future is. i remember in the '80s, when i was signing up for grad school they wanted me to speak japanese because remember in the '80s, the japanese economy was going to rule the world. it's trying to let government sort of choose winners and losers and predict the future. how do you do -- hopefully where the governor will actually go is providing to give the students the choice. >> i don't think it is actually picking winners or losers when you say this is a language spoken by a billion people around the world. people who speak japanese today, by the way, have a good leg up. it is still an important part of our global economy. >> governor, t
in a prison fight. it nathan leopold basically will his body to science. biological tests, subjected his body to biological tests and it pulled the point. the thing that is ironic about it. the judge, the man who was the judge in that trial did not accept clarence darrow's argument. he sentenced them to life imprisonment because he was convinced in his memoirs he was convinced it would be the more cruel thing, the more cruel punishment. so clarence darrow never knew that this judge did not accept his argument. he actually made a wonderful argument against the death penalty, but the judge did not accept it. anyway. >> it is a famous argument, and it is a classic darrow argument in that it does not start at a endo disease. it starts as a end then it backtracks and wonders of them bring up in and no and be. if you talk for three days you can't go from aided be. the total impression will be lost. he had to sort of read back like of be looking for a flower. and one of the things that he consistently did in the trial, illinois had never executed teenager's in a case where they pled guilty, and so h
who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train 2 million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. [ cheers and applause ] we need to cut our oil imports in half, create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that is the choice in this election and that is why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. [ cheers and applause ] now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got an extreme makeover, but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top down economics that we've seen before. he think that is if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts, that, yes, skew towards the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be involved. jobs and prosp
excellent question, scott. race has no biological basis. science rejects the concept. that's why when people ascribe biological certainties to race, they sound racist, but race is real as a social construct. it has so much social and political meaning and it's shaped so much of society that even if you think you're color blind, the perceptions of race are so baked into society you can't even easily super seisedem by being myopic. as dr. lopez once wrote, social meanings connect our faces to our souls, race is neither an essence nor an illusion but rather an ongoing contradictory self-reinforcing process subject to the macro forces of social and political struggle and the microeffects of daily decisions. that does to for the cycle. do you have any good on the show today? >> yes and you have stolen 40 seconds of my show and i'm not going to talk to you. good news for america fuels a republican conspiracy theory bigger than alien abduction. ♪ >> this morning we found out that the unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level since i took office. >> there is widespread mistrust
scrambling to deal with the fallout and so are the people whose convictions were based on the science that's now in question. here's susan candiotti. >> it was refreshing because i didn't think it was real. >> reporter: but it was real. until last week, eliza johnson was doing about three years in prison on a drug conviction. then she was suddenly set free. what is it like to be out of prison? >> free now. yay! i can breathe. >> reporter: free because of the bizarre alleged actions of this woman, former massachusetts chemist, annie duken. >> can you tell us what happened? >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing her of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment, she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab, now closed by the state, duken allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. try the #1 gastroenterologist recommended probiotic. align. align naturally helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ ooh, baby, can i do for you today? ♪ try align today. lavar. >>> welcome back to the ed show. mitt romney did something truly unusual even for him. 17 days after his infamous 47% remarks he now says he was wrong. sean hannity asked romney. what would he have said if president obama had raised the 47% remarks in the debate the other night? here is romney's answer. >> clearly in a campaign with hundreds if not thousands of speeches and question and answer sessions now and then you're going to say something that doesn't come out right. in this case i said something that is just completely wrong. and i absolutely believe, however, that my life has shown that i care about 100%. >> president obama didn't bring up the 47% remarks in the debate and caught a lot of flack for it. i question it here on this network to one of his advisers. but he probably wanted to avoid giving romney the chance to address it in
, edwards life sciences bucking the trend up 1.6% today after jeffrey boosted its revenue estimates starting this quarter saying it's seen strength from the company's heart valve. also raising its price target by 10 bucks to 125. keep in mind the fda is expected any day to approve an expansion of sepina's use to high-risk surgical patients noted by wells fargo yesterday. seeing a spike in this stock, at 107, spot 22. >>> the nasdaq with sema. >> reporter: a lot of big movers in tech. research in motion the best performing stock on the nasdaq 100 after reporting earnings last night. of course all eyes on that blackberry 10 device slated for the first half of 2013. facebook another big mover up 7%. pete najarian saying the sheryl sandberg interview on monday could be a catalyst to the stock similar to what we saw after mark zuckerberg spoke at that tech crunch conference. qualcomm, ubs writing that the near concerns related to the shipments could hit a soft patch in the next quarter. >>> today's power player is the chief investment strategist with oppenheimer funds with $82 billion under manag
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. i'm sharon epperson at the nymex. gold closing right now right where we started the week. gold prices closing just around $1,780 an ounce. we're down $14, $15 on the session. of course the fact that we got a better than expected jobs number means that we probably won't see quicker stimulus, though there may not be much change to what the federal reserve has already laid out in terms what have they're doing with monetary easing. gold prices this week have come close to the $1,800 level but have been unable to close above that mark. last week when china's back in session and we have geopolitics on the horizon, it could be a different picture. keep your eye on south africa in terms in palladium and platinum. back to you. >>> check out these gas prices. they're averaging about $3.80 a gallon pretty much across the country. but imagine this -- what if the u.s. started running low on gasoline? in parts of car crazy, california, my old home, that's become a reality and prices are indeed soarin
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." now filling in for bill, here's john fuglesang. >> john: i have the best ring in town. if you call me during the show, will you hear the coolest ring tone. >> is that right? joan the pop song of the past four years that makes the coolest possible ring tone. >> i'm tempted to call you. >> john: i will have to share it. everyone will steal it. when you have a pop song come out of your phone, it is usually jarring. i found the perfect one. it is the rolling stones. this is the "bill press show." you have to guess which show. i'm john fuglesang filling in for bill all morning long. we're taking your calls. apparent there is a debate tomorrow. i wish the media would talk about this a little bit. i've never seen the media talk about something that hasn't happened yet more than they talk about the stuff
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